The Simple Truth of Turning 30

Growing Young

My parents were in their early 30’s when I was born, a period that I cannot believe that I am fast approaching in my own life (and no, this is not a pregnancy announcement, but more of a realization announcement). Growing up, I was incredibly blessed to have had a stable and loving home that allowed me to enjoy all the wonders of childhood. I remember looking at my parents in awe, wondering if one day I too would know how to navigate life on my own and terrified by how complicated it all seemed. Then suddenly, I was flung into a self-centred and turbulent stage of adolescence, followed by a period of self-discovery and experimentation in my early 20’s. Amazingly I came out on the other side of my younger days relatively unscathed, having found a more stable and grounded sense of identity in my late 20’s. Today I am finally ready to take on the title of adult and confront the complexities of life with a simple truth.

I could most certainly write an entire book about those earlier stages, with all the turbulence and self-discovery that one encounters throughout those prominent years. However, I will save those stories for another time and today, on the eve of my 30th birthday, share some of the lessons I have learned from years of growing, learning, and living on the roller coaster that has been the past 3 decades:

  1. Context reveals peace and clarity – After years of egocentric living as an adolescent and young adult, peace was finally attained when I shifted my focus outward from the self towards the larger context of connectedness. Mother Teresa says, “If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.” When we view every situation solely in relation to the self, we miss out on the interwoven stories of others that we are also a part of. Being able to recognize the larger context in which we exist helps to clarify the whys of seemingly unfair situations and releases us from the “why me?” of narrow, self-focused living.
  2. Your body is a temple that needs tending – I remember one crazy summer when I worked 2 jobs, was taking an art class, and doing hot yoga every day. It was a time when my body was unstoppable and my energy stores ran deep. Today, my need for an extra cup of coffee, a few more hours of sleep, and good ergonomics is undeniable. Through this sobering shift, my understanding of the body has grown from merely being an afterthought into one of respect and partnership. The body is a map of the past, present and future; a gift from your ancestors and a divine mystery of creation. As such, it deserves and needs to be cared for, understood, and valued as an important part of how we experience life. Yoga Girl (aka Rachel Brathen) explains that “My body is connected to my emotions. My emotions are connected to my thoughts. My thoughts are connected to my ability to stay present. And my ability to stay present is connected to my body.”
  3. Time speeds up with its own passage – I used to waste the days away without a care in the world. Time was a vast and never ending desert that I had my whole life to traverse. However, somehow in the blink of an eye that desert has transformed into a high-speed highway without an off-ramp in sight. The days fly by as I try to schedule and manipulate every second I have to keep up with all the have-to’s and should-do’s that clutter up the day-to-day. However, time is not a dimension that we are meant to control without intense stress; rather it is a reality we are free to climb on in order to better enjoy the view on the ride of life. For when Alice asks the white rabbit in Wonderland, “How long is forever?” The white rabbit responds, “Sometimes just one second.”
  4. Everything is subject to change– My first year as a Public Health Nurse was one of intense learning and growing up. I was no longer a student who could hide behind the certainty of books and scheduled classes. I needed to figure out how to navigate the working world of office politics, waiting for vacation time, and going with the flow; for as a very wise colleague would always remind me, “everything is subject to change.” This I have come to realize is true in every facet of life including our relationships, the environment, the economy, and our priorities. This fact has led me to the practice of the Beginner’s Mind, the freedom from getting stuck in the expectations of past experience. It is an attitude that accepts change with openness and curiosity. Studying the works of Jon Kabat-Zinn has helped me to better understand and embrace this way of being which “allows us to be receptive to new possibilities and prevents us from getting stuck in the rut of our own expertise, which often thinks it knows more than it does.”
  5. Love is all you need – This is by far the simplest but most important lesson I have learned, period. Monetary success, job titles, and fancy things are all ways that we as humans create stress through competition, arrogance, and egocentricity. Putting all these above relationship is what All you need is lovefuels the endless rat race many of us are trying to find rest from. We have a tendency to complicate life by over-crowding it with all the wants and shoulds that quickly become our top priorities. But what I have come to appreciate with age, especially as time speeds up and everything keeps changing, is that the one constant I can cling to and be comforted by is love. Money, jobs, and stuff are not bad things in and of themselves, but when we think they are the ultimate be-all-and-end-all behind our efforts, it becomes easy to lose context of the bigger picture: our connectedness to one another. I always find it tragic how humans can take this truth and distort it over and over again through the corruption of religion and politics by exploiting others all in the name of power. However, I believe that the solution is simple, free and available to all in every situation: love one another (John 13: 34-35). That’s it. Period. And so, just as The Beatles sang, revolutionaries in their own right, “All you need is love.”
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Luke’s Update: Light shines brightest in the darkest night

In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present.

– Francis Bacon

It has been one month since Luke’s surgery. Here is an update on his progress:

The day of the surgery and the almost 2 weeks he spent in hospital afterward were nothing short of scary and traumatic. My parents were able to prepare Luke for getting to the hospital but were unable to explain that he would not be back home that evening since it is difficult for Luke to process too far into the future. Every day was heartbreaking as Luke would sob in an attempt to cope with pain, confusion, and home sickness. My parents would take shifts so that he was never alone, which meant they too became isolated and weary.

With each passing day, Luke got stronger and stronger, both physically and emotionally, until the day he was finally discharged home. The hospital decided that Luke was not compliant enough to be admitted into a long-term rehab facility and so sent him home with weekly physio and nursing care. This turned out to be a great blessing, since being back in his own environment where friends can visit has continued to inspire him to work hard each and every day towards recovery and my parents can once again work together as a team. I receive texts, pictures and pLuke at homehone calls about his daily progress, and my heart aches as I wish I could hold Luke when he cries and be able to cheer him on as he does laps around the house with his walker. My mom and dad, true heroes in their own right, have pulled him through by being his coaches, care aids, and ever shining light.

Family is the greatest gift, one that can so easily be taken for granted. Without family, which includes an incredible community of friends, Luke’s journey to recovery would have been a treacherous one. Your thoughts, prayers, and support over the past month have definitely proven the incredible power of community. Being non-verbal in our ever-stretched health care system is most often a sentence of being forgotten. Let us not forget those without a voice, for if we take the time to listen we will see that they have so much to teach us beyond what words can say. Please share this story as a dedication to all those with disabilities who need advocacy and in reverence to all the selfless parents and caregivers who truly are the definition of unconditional love.

A request. A prayer. A plea.

In 3 days time my sweet brother, Luke will be having hip replacement surgery. He is only 26 years old and yet arthritis has crippled him with pain and stolen joy from even the simplest activities. You may be thinking 26 years old…he is too young to have arthritis! Well, Luke also has Trisomy 21, better known as Down Syndrome. Individuals with Down Syndrome are at higher risk for various musculoskeletal conditions and autoimmune diseases which can lead to the development of arthritis. What started out as an occasional complaint of leg pain and a slight limp, quickly progressed into debilitating pain and physical disability for Luke. Despite Luke’s inability to clearly articulate what he is feeling, his tears and noticeable distress say more than words could ever express to us. For when Luke cannot get out of bed to go to the YMCA (his favourite activity of the week), it is clear that something is not ok.

Following a very difficult pre-operative appointment on New Year’s Eve, my parents brought Luke back home feeling unsupported and apprehensive after being told to reconsider their decision to have the surgery by hospital staff. Yes, Luke is stubborn and strong-willed…It took half an hour to take his blood pressure and his blood work could not be completed even after an hour of trying. However, how can we let him live in pain, on 8 pills of Tylenol #3 a day for the rest of his life when there is the possibility of fixing his hip? As a healthcare professional myself, it is frustrating to hear how quickly the nurses and doctors want to give up. Luke cannot advocate for himself. He has not been given a voice to stand up for himself. Luckily, both of us have been blessed with strong, smart, and brave parents who will carry him through the adversity.

Being so far away at this time is heartbreaking. Through all the doctor’s appointments, hospital visits, and tests that my family have endured, I have anxiously awaited updates from 4000 km away. Even now as I type, I must fight a lump in my throat and the tears that cloud my vision. I wish I could stand alongside my parents at this time, carry some of the burden, and ease my brother’s pain. Yet in this moment all I can do is pray, surrender my guilt, and trust in the community of love all around us. Therefore, I ask for your prayers, positivity, and healing intentions. “A miracle is a shift in thinking, a shift from fear to love” (Marianne Williamson). Help us pull Luke through the negativity and fear. Help us surround him with love.

Photo courtesy of Iron & Bragg Photography

http://www.ironbragg.com/